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Out of the lab,
onto the front line

Cancer Treatment

Nuclear Power

impacts and consequences

MARIE CURIE'S WORK HAS TAKEN US INTO A BRAVE NEW WORLD.
SEE HOW THE IMPACTS OF HER DISCOVERIES ARE STILL FELT TODAY.

impacts and consequences

Out of the lab, onto the
front line

Marie was more than a brilliant mind. She was a humanitarian who wanted her science to save lives.

When the First World War broke out, Marie put her work on hold. She dedicated herself to designing the ‘radiological car’ – a portable X-ray unit for army surgeons to use on the battlefield.

These life-saving vehicles became known as ‘Little Curies’.

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impacts and consequences

The seed of an idea:
Cancer treatment

In the years after the Curies discovered radium, they soon began to recognise its medical potential, discovering that radiation could kill cancer cells more quickly than healthy cells.

This realisation gave us a real chance against cancer for the first time.

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impacts and consequences

Power in our hands:
Nuclear energy

Others built on Marie and Pierre’s work. After Marie’s death in the 1930s, researchers found that they could split the nucleus of the atom, releasing energy in a potent reaction called ‘nuclear fission’.

Then the Second World War broke out, and scientists everywhere raced to build a nuclear weapon. The United States carried out the first successful test in July 1945, and a month later, nuclear bombs were dropped on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

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impacts and consequences

MARIE CURIE'S WORK HAS TAKEN US INTO A BRAVE NEW WORLD. SEE HOW THE IMPACTS OF HER DISCOVERIES ARE STILL FELT TODAY.

Watch

Out of the lab,
onto the front line

Cancer Treatment

Nuclear Power

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